How to talk to your child about bullying

Make bullying a topic at the dinner table.

The best time to start talking about bullying at school or the after-school care center is BEFORE your child was bullied. You will be amazed at the knowledge the children have on this topic. Some of the talking points could be:

What is bullying?

  • What motivates some children to bully others?
  • How do children who are bullied feel?
  • What can each child do who feels bullied?
  • How can one child help another who is being affected?
  • What can you and your staff do against the bullying

For children, bullying has serious consequences.

Therefore, if you detect physical or psychological signals of bullying in your child, don’t let it slip or wait if the situation will resolve by itself.

There are a few strategic points you can take:

First, explain to your child that nothing is wrong or bad about him. They are not the only victim.

Advise your child to tell an adult at school – for example, their favorite teacher. Contact the classroom teacher.

Clarify together the places where the attacks happen and how your child can avoid these places. If avoidance is not possible, advise your child to ensure that familiar people are there.

Advise your child not to try to “buy his or her way out” of attacks by giving candy or gifts. Do not meet your child’s demands for extra (pocket) money.

Work out a plan with your child and a responsible teacher. If the attacks occur again, the plan should be followed, and an adult informed.

Talk to your child. Be patient and do not press them. Instead, let your child know that he can come to you at any time and with any concerns.

Especially with boys, it can be helpful to combine the conversation with an activity (e.g., a

walk, a bike ride, a car ride). However, the conversation often goes better when connected to an action.

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